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  • 16-Feb-2012 01:12 EST

Ford 2011 6.7L Power Stroke® Diesel Engine Combustion System Development

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This session covers topics regarding new CI and SI engines and components. This includes analytical, experimental, and computational studies covering hardware development as well as design and analysis techniques.

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Joshua Styron, Ford Motor Co.

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Technical Paper / Journal Article
2011-04-12
TECH PPR 2011 CONG SP-2322
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