• Video
  • 24-Jan-2012 05:03 EST

Advances in Exhaust Temperature Sensing and their Applicability for Diesel Emission Diagnostics

00:27:28
Length:

Purchase Required to View Video

Short Preview Below

Sensing exhaust gas temperature is a key component in diesel after treatment systems for both control and diagnostics. Accuracy varies significantly depending upon the sensing technology and implementation in the system. Prior published work has demonstrated that resistance based temperature sensors are not able to achieve the system accuracy required for advanced diagnostics over the life of the emission system. This presentation will show that it is feasible to achieve better than �10�C end of life system accuracy by means of active thermocouple technology. Results from tests at Michigan Technological University will be used to illustrate diagnostic uncertainty related to the application of temperature sensors and a specific DOC/DPF example will be used to show the benefits of accurate temperature based diagnostics.

Presenter
D. P. Culbertson, Watlow Gordon

Buy
Select
Price
List
Purchase to View
$19.00
Share
HTML for Linking to Page
Page URL
Grade
Rate It
No ratings yet

View More Video

Video
2015-04-16
“Spotlight on Design” features video interviews and case study segments, focusing on the latest technology breakthroughs. Viewers are virtually taken to labs and research centers to learn how design engineers are enhancing product performance/reliability, reducing cost, improving quality, safety or environmental impact, and achieving regulatory compliance. In the episode “Diagnostics and Prognostics: Proactive Maintenance and Failure Prevention” (21:04), Delphi engineers explain how they leverage the growing number of sensors and computing power in vehicles to diagnose and proactively solve emerging mechanical or electronic problems, before a breakdown occurs. This video also looks at the next generation of automotive telematics, with HEM Data demonstrating how in-vehicle data acquisition is used to monitor the inner workings of vehicles.
Video
2012-02-01
Hybrid technology has the potential to enable dramatic reductions in greenhouse gases (GHG), such as the California goal of reducing GHG by 80 percent from 1990 levels by 2050. As a result it is expected that hybrid systems will occupy a growing proportion of the market. However, introducing a hybrid system in a vehicle may adversely affect the performance of the engine OBD system in monitoring malfunctions impacting pollutant emissions. For example, a hybrid system that reduces time of the engine in idle or deceleration overrun conditions could make a well-performing engine OBD system noncompliant, by reducing in-use frequency of some OBD monitors below acceptable levels. In this presentation, Ricardo will present a process for evaluating the impact that a hybrid system which has been optimised to minimise GHG emission over a specified drive-cycle will have on the effectiveness of engine OBD monitors.
Video
2012-01-24
Revisions to the California OBD-II diesel regulations required many updates to various SAE and ISO on-board diagnostic standards; these include major revisions to SAE J1979, J1699-3, J2012 and J1930. This presentation is intended to review the background for these changes as well as the revisions made in these documents. Presenter Robert Gruszczynski, Volkswagen of America
Video
2012-02-16
The presentation describes technology developments and the integration of these technologies into new emission control systems. As in other years, the reader will find a wide range of topics from various parts of the world. This is reflective of the worldwide scope and effort to reduce diesel exhaust emissions. Topics include the integration of various diesel particulate matter (PM) and Nitrogen Oxide (NOx) technologies as well as sensors and other emissions related developments. Presenter Atsuo Kondo, NGK Insulators, Ltd.

Related Items

Training / Education
2009-12-15
Training / Education
2017-10-03
Training / Education
2017-09-21