• Video
  • 16-Mar-2012 09:21 EDT

Study of Exit Burr Formation and Exit Burr Reduction in Automated Drilling of Titanium Stacked With Carbon Fiber Composite

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With the growing use of carbon fiber composite structure in Aircraft Manufacturing, the challenge of drilling carbon fiber stacked with Titanium has become a focus point. Due to the abrasive nature of the carbon fiber (CF), cutting tool life is relatively short when drilling carbon fiber stalked with Titanium. A common drill wear indicator is exit burr formation in the Titanium. As drilling tools wear due to the abrasive nature of the CF, the exit burr in the in the Titanium increases. This study seeks to understand the factors that lead to tool wear and exit burr formation. A correlation may be made relating drilling thrust forces with exit burr formation. Different cutting tools geometries and materials are studied using a high speed camera to attempt to understand the factors influencing exit burr formation. Findings are optimized and tested. Decreasing exit burr in the drilling of CF and Titanium may increase tool life thereby reducing tool costs to airframe manufacturers. Authors Richard Garrick-Precorp Hans Juergen Borchers- Precorp Jeremy Bunting- Sandvik Coromant John Dredge- Precorp

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Aaron Howcroft, Precorp Inc.

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