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  • 27-Mar-2012 02:33 EDT

Understanding the Green - and the Not So Green - Consumer

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Automakers, suppliers, public agencies, interest groups and others are increasingly embracing the environment as one of the dominant forces in the US automotive market. All parties have a strong vested interest in understanding how environmental concerns will influence design, production, marketing and usage of tomorrow�s vehicles. A common need of all parties is independent and actionable information to enable them to make better decisions and have the greatest chance of being successful in this uncertain future. Four factors - an uncertain economic climate; a constantly changing governmental regulatory system; advancements in powertrain technology; and ever-present environmental concerns - continue to shape the automotive landscape. While automakers are focused on developing alternative powertrains and alternative fuel options for an increasingly �green� vehicle market, J.D. Power and Associates is focused on gauging consumer interest and acceptance of these technologies, especially among new-vehicle intenders.

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Mike Vannieuwkuyk, JD Power And Associates

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Technical Paper / Journal Article
2012-02-21
CONSUMER VIEWPOINTS AND MARKET
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