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  • 29-Mar-2012 11:01 EDT

BMW i3 - A Battery Electric Vehicle...Right from the Beginning

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What are the requirements of customers in an urban environment? What will sustainable mobility look like in the future? This presentation gives an overview of the integrated approach used by BMW to develop the BMW i3 - a purpose-built battery electric vehicle. Very low driving resistances for such a vehicle concept enable the delivery of both impressive range and driving excitement. A small optional auxiliary power unit offers range security for unexpected situations and opens up BEVs to customers who are willing to buy a BEV but are still hesitant due to range anxiety. Additional electric vehicles sold to the formerly range anxious will create additional electric miles.

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Franz Storkenmaier, BMW Group

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Technical Paper / Journal Article
2012-02-23
APPLICATION OF ELECTRIC VEHICL
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