• Video
  • 10-Apr-2012 02:53 EDT

Hybrid, Plug-In Hybrid, and Electric School Buses. Where and when?

This talk will describe the nuances of a number of different types of driveline and how these will perform in the school bus marketplace. We will cover the results of the Plug-In School Bus program and some of the successes and challenges seen in those buses. Finally, we will discuss a vision for where the market is likely to go on the next 5-10-and 20 years.

Presenter
Ewan Pritchard, North Carolina State Univ.

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Technical Paper / Journal Article
HYBRID, PLUG-IN HYBRID, AND EL
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