• Video
  • 16-May-2012 01:25 EDT

The Supply of the Heavy Earth Metals and the demand for them by the Global OEM Automotive Industry

00:51:10
Length:

Purchase Required to View Video

Short Preview Below

There has recently been a great deal of hypothesizing and prognosticating about the security of supply of the rare earths for the non-Chinese OEM automotive industry. The pundits and industry analysts have warned of demand destruction by substitution driven by sustained high prices as well as due to supply interruptions. What has been overlooked for the most part is that the issue is not about all of the rare earths; it is just about some of them, the critical rare earths. And even in that category there are two separate issues: 1) Is there enough production of the light rare earth, neodymium, to sustain current demand and can its non-Chinese production grow to meet expected non-Chinese demand? and 2.) Is there even enough production of the heavy rare earths, dysprosium and terbium, to meet current Chinese demand and is it possible to produce dysprosium a.) Outside of China, and b.) In a finished form that could be used to manufacture under the hood rare earth permanent magnets outside of China? This presentation will bring the audience up to date on these issues, and will emphasize that the overwhelming majority of the OEM automotive industry demand for the rare earths critical to its products is, first and foremost, for the under the hood accessories of the powertrains of internal combustion powered vehicles, the next largest use is for the passenger cabin accessories for all vehicles, and last today is the demand from the under the hood powertrains of EVs and Hybrid Electric Vehicles. Assuming that the security and quantity of supply issues for dysprosium are resolved the growth of demand for products containing them will not depend just on the future growth of the market for EVs and HEVs, not at all.

Presenter
Jack Lifton, JACK LIFTON LLC

Author:
Sector:
Topic:
Affiliated:
Buy
Select
Price
List
Purchase to View
$19.00
Share
HTML for Linking to Page
Page URL
Grade
Rate It
No ratings yet

View More Video

Video
2012-02-14
FutureSteelVehicle's (FSV) objective is to develop detailed design concepts for a radically different steel body structure for a compact Battery Electric Vehicle (BEV). It also will identify structure changes to accommodate larger Plug-In Hybrid (PHEV) and Fuel Cell (FCEV) vehicle variants. The presentation will demonstrate seven optimized structural sub-systems that contribute to the program's 35 percent mass reduction goals and meet its safety and life cycle emissions targets. It will explain the advanced design optimization process used and the resulting aggressive steel concepts. Presenter Jody R. Shaw, US Steel
Video
2012-03-23
This article characterizes the special features of drilling of CFRP/Titanium and -Aluminium stacks. Simplified theoretic models will show how CFRP/Titanium stacks should be machined without scratches and burn marks contacting carbon. Low axial forces and smart chip removal technology are the main characteristics of the drilling tool technology, optimized to reach H8 quality in one shot operation. Presenter Peter Mueller-Hummel, Cutting Tools Inc.
Video
2012-05-16
The copper-rotor induction-motor made its debut in automotive electric traction in 1990 in GM's Impact EV. Since then, this motor architecture has covered millions of miles on other vehicle platforms which will soon include Toyota's RAV4-EV. With the industry's attention focused on cost-effective alternatives to permanent-magnet traction motors, the induction motor has returned to the spotlight. This talk will overview where the copper-rotor induction-motor is today, how the technology has evolved since the days of the GM Impact, the state-of-play in its mass-manufacturing processes and today's major supply-chain players. Presenter Malcolm Burwell, International Copper Association Inc.
Video
2012-06-18
All internal combustion piston engines emit solid nanoparticles. Some are soot particles resulting from incomplete combustion of fuels, or lube oil. Some particles are metal compounds, most probably metal oxides. A major source of metal compound particles is engine abrasion. The lube oil transports these abraded particles into the combustion zone. There they are partially vaporized and ultrafine oxide particles formed through nucleation [1]. Other sources are the metallic additives to the lube oil, metallic additives in the fuel, and debris from the catalytic coatings in the exhaust-gas emission control devices. The formation process results in extremely fine particles, typically smaller than 50 nm. Thus they intrude through the alveolar membranes directly into the human organism. The consequent health risk necessitates a careful investigation of these emissions and effective curtailment.

Related Items

Technical Paper / Journal Article
2010-04-12
Training / Education
2013-02-20
Training / Education
2013-04-09
Training / Education
2013-04-09
Standard
1966-08-01