• Video
  • 22-May-2012 02:10 EDT

Safety Element out of Context - A Practical Approach

00:20:20
Length:

Purchase Required to View Video

Short Preview Below

ISO 26262 is the actual standard for Functional Safety of automotive E/E (Electric/Electronic) systems. One of the challenges in the application of the standard is the distribution of safety related activities among the participants in the supply chain. In this paper, the concept of a Safety Element out of Context (SEooC) development will be analyzed showing its current problematic aspects and difficulties in implementing such an approach in a concrete typical automotive development flow with different participants (e.g. from OEM, tier 1 to semiconductor supplier) in the supply chain. The discussed aspects focus on the functional safety requirements of generic hardware and software development across the supply chain where the final integration of the developed element is not known at design time and therefore an assumption based mechanism shall be used. The inherent ambiguity deriving from such assumption based distribution of requirements also makes the responsibility allocation on the development chain difficult.

This paper also proposes improvements and extensions of the SEooC concept which may lead to an increased usability of the approach in modern development lifecycles. In order to demonstrate and evaluate the proposed modifications of the SEooC approach, a concrete example (the implementation of a generic AUTOSAR complex device driver for electric motor control) will be described in the paper. The chosen case study is generic and representative for a large spectrum of functional safety relevant automotive applications like Electric Power Steering, Dynamic Steering, X-by-Wire, etc.

Presenter
Marc Born, ikv++ technologies AG

Buy
Select
Price
List
Purchase to View
$19.00
Learn More
Technical Paper / Journal Article
2012-04-16
TECH PPR 2012 CONG
Share
HTML for Linking to Page
Page URL
Grade
Rate It
No ratings yet

View More Video

Video
2012-01-30
OBD system requirements were first developed by the California Air Resources Board, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, and the European Commission. New OBD requirements should be as consistent as possible with existing requirements to maximize reliability and to minimize system complexity, proliferation of configurations, and consumer cost. New OBD requirements from around the world are briefly reviewed and most are consistent with the original U.S. and European requirements. Worldwide OBD requirements are being further harmonized under the United Nations, Economic Commission for Europe, World Forum for Harmonization of Vehicle Regulations (WP29). Presenter David H. Ferris, General Motors Company
Video
2012-02-01
Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicles (PHEVs) are entering the market and bring with them new OBD issues. A key one is how to measure in-use monitor performance ratio and where to set a standard for this, as PHEVs will have varying amounts of engine-on operation depending on customer plug-in and driving behavior. Toyota�s Prius PHEV system is described and customer use data from a US demonstration fleet is examined. Some prior denominator proposals by Toyota and CARB are explained, as background for the current CARB/industry agreement for denominator and ratio. Presenter Morton M. Smith, Toyota
Video
2012-01-23
Update on light-duty regulations. Presenter Michael J. McCarthy, California Air Resources Board
Video
2012-02-01
Update on heavy-duty regulations. Presenter Michael J. McCarthy, California Air Resources Board

Related Items

Training / Education
2010-03-15
Technical Paper / Journal Article
2004-03-08
Technical Paper / Journal Article
2004-03-08
Training / Education
2007-03-01