• Video
  • 05-Jun-2012 06:32 EDT

Impact of Supervisory Control on Criteria Tailpipe Emissions for an Extended-Range Electric Vehicle

00:14:41
Length:

Purchase Required to View Video

Short Preview Below

The Hybrid Electric Vehicle Team of Virginia Tech participated in the three-year EcoCAR Advanced Vehicle Technology Competition organized by Argonne National Laboratory, and sponsored by General Motors and the U.S. Department of Energy. The team established goals for the design of a plug-in, range-extended hybrid electric vehicle that meets or exceeds the competition requirements for EcoCAR. The challenge involved designing a crossover SUV powertrain to reduce fuel consumption, petroleum energy use, regulated tailpipe emissions, and well-to-wheel greenhouse gas emissions. To interface with and control the hybrid powertrain, the team added a Hybrid Vehicle Supervisory Controller, which enacts a torque split control strategy.

This paper builds on an earlier paper [1] that evaluated the petroleum energy use, criteria tailpipe emissions, and greenhouse gas emissions of the Virginia Tech EcoCAR vehicle and control strategy from the 2nd year of the competition. The Year 2 control strategy was further refined to reduce tailpipe emissions and fuel consumption based on chassis dynamometer testing results gathered during Year 3 of the competition. Criteria tailpipe emissions, such as carbon monoxide, oxides of nitrogen, and hydrocarbons, were touched on briefly in the previous paper but not in depth. This paper presents the results from an empirical study of the impact of changes in the hybrid supervisory control strategy on emissions and energy consumption, and evaluates the success of the changes made to the control strategy based on test data taken in the third and final year of the EcoCAR competition. The improved control strategy enabled the vehicle to achieve a utility-factor-corrected fuel consumption of 82 mpgge on combined city and highway driving, as well as Tier 2 Bin 2 tailpipe emissions as defined by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), when driven on the EcoCAR drive cycle, an on-road approximation of 55% city and 45% highway driving.

Presenter
Patrick Walsh

Buy
Select
Price
List
Purchase to View
$19.00
Share
HTML for Linking to Page
Page URL
Grade
Rate It
No ratings yet

View More Video

Video
2012-06-18
All internal combustion piston engines emit solid nanoparticles. Some are soot particles resulting from incomplete combustion of fuels, or lube oil. Some particles are metal compounds, most probably metal oxides. A major source of metal compound particles is engine abrasion. The lube oil transports these abraded particles into the combustion zone. There they are partially vaporized and ultrafine oxide particles formed through nucleation [1]. Other sources are the metallic additives to the lube oil, metallic additives in the fuel, and debris from the catalytic coatings in the exhaust-gas emission control devices. The formation process results in extremely fine particles, typically smaller than 50 nm. Thus they intrude through the alveolar membranes directly into the human organism. The consequent health risk necessitates a careful investigation of these emissions and effective curtailment.
Video
2017-03-22
Last week, the EPA decided to revisit a review of automotive emission standards. In this episode of SAE Eye on Engineering, Editor-In-Chief Lindsay Brooke looks at the upcoming mid-term review of automotive emission standards. SAE Eye on Engineering also airs Monday mornings on WJR 760 AM Detroit's Paul W. Smith Show. Access archived episodes of SAE Eye on Engineering.
Video
2012-06-18
Currently, two consolidated aftertreatment technologies are available for the reduction of NOx emissions from diesel engines: Urea SCR (Selective Catalytic Reduction) systems and LNT (Lean NOx Trap) systems. Urea SCR technology, which has been widely used for many years at stationary sources, is becoming nowadays an attractive alternative also for light-duty diesel applications. However, SCR systems are much more effective in NOx reduction efficiency at high load operating conditions than light load condition, characterized by lower exhaust gas temperatures.
Video
2012-06-05
What will the passenger car fleet look like over the next two decades? As most expected, affordability and convenience are the major drivers of new vehicle technology penetration into the market. Within this scope, vehicle electrification strategy to limit oil dependence and meet the European targets for CO2 emissions should be cost-effective and convenient to the buyer. This paper will focus first, through different economic models, on the penetration of passenger electrified vehicles (Plug-in Hybrid Vehicles PHVs and Electric Vehicles EVs) in Europe (EU15: 15 European Union member countries) up to 2030. Economic models are based on real world use behaviors and driving patterns in order to compute fuel and energy consumption and to estimate total cost of the vehicle including incentives. The economic models use household wages in order to later make conclusions on vehicle technology market shares by vehicle classes.

Related Items

Book
2013-12-16
Training / Education
2017-12-18
Technical Paper / Journal Article
2010-10-25
Technical Paper / Journal Article
2011-04-12
Technical Paper / Journal Article
2011-04-12