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  • 18-Jun-2012 11:48 EDT

SCR Deactivation Study for OBD Applications

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Selective catalytic reduction (SCR) catalysts will be used to reduce oxides of nitrogen (NOx) emissions from internal combustion engines in a number of applications [1,2,3,4]. Southwest Research Institute® (SwRI)® performed an Internal Research & Development project to study SCR catalyst thermal deactivation. The study included a V/W/TiO2 formulation, a Cu-zeolite formulation and an Fe-zeolite formulation. This work describes NOx timed response to ammonia (NH3) transients as a function of thermal aging time and temperature. It has been proposed that the response time of NOx emissions to NH3 transients, effected by changes in diesel emissions fluid (DEF) injection rate, could be used as an on-board diagnostic (OBD) metric. The objective of this study was to evaluate the feasibility and practicality of this OBD approach. While these experiments showed a noticeable trend with aging, there were also observations and considerations that suggest this approach may be reasonable as a catalyst aging evaluation test method, but impractical for OBD purposes.

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Gordon J. Bartley, Southwest Research Institute

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Technical Paper / Journal Article
2012-04-16
TECH PPR 2012 CONG SP-2324
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