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  • 16-May-2012 01:42 EDT

Copper-Rotor Induction- Motors: One Alternative to Rare Earths in Traction Motors

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The copper-rotor induction-motor made its debut in automotive electric traction in 1990 in GM's Impact EV. Since then, this motor architecture has covered millions of miles on other vehicle platforms which will soon include Toyota's RAV4-EV. With the industry's attention focused on cost-effective alternatives to permanent-magnet traction motors, the induction motor has returned to the spotlight. This talk will overview where the copper-rotor induction-motor is today, how the technology has evolved since the days of the GM Impact, the state-of-play in its mass-manufacturing processes and today's major supply-chain players.

Presenter
Malcolm Burwell, International Copper Association Inc.

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