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  • 15-Apr-2015 03:23 EDT

Spotlight on Design: Fuel Efficiency: Racing Toward CAFE 2025

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“Spotlight on Design” features video interviews and case study segments, focusing on the latest technology breakthroughs. Viewers are virtually taken to labs and research centers to learn how design engineers are enhancing product performance/reliability, reducing cost, improving quality, safety or environmental impact, and achieving regulatory compliance.

Fuel efficiency, or simply put, how to get more mileage out of the same amount of fuel has become one of the main goals to be achieved by new automotive technologies in the future, thanks in part to new government regulations.

In the episode “Fuel Efficiency: Racing toward CAFE 2025” (21:24) AVL engineers show simulation and testing being used to design more fuel efficient vehicles, including the equipment that actually analyzes fuel economy. HEM Data demonstrates its data acquisition technology, and engineers at the Environmental Protection Agency’s National Vehicle and Fuel Emissions Laboratory demonstrate how fuel economy is tested by a government organization.

This episode highlights multiple areas of interest, including:

- Background and definitions of fuel efficiency

- Government regulations on fuel economy

- Simulation technologies used for fuel economy improvement

- Test equipment used to measure fuel economy

- EPA fuel economy testing

- Future trends

Also Available in DVD Format

You May Also Be Interested In: Insight: Fuel Efficiency: Fuel Economy Testing

To subscribe to a full-season of Spotlight on Design, please contact SAE Corporate Sales: 1-888-875-3976 or CustomerSales@sae.org.

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